Styles

Aiea: ‘No dirty bomb evidence in three Ukrainian plants’ – World

Nuclear inspectors found no evidence of “undeclared nuclear activities” at three power plants in Ukraine. This was stated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (Aiea), quoted by Sky News.

Ukraine has asked inspectors to visit its nuclear power plants to disprove Russia’s claims that Kiev intends to use a “dirty bomb”. “Our technical and scientific assessment of the results we have so far is that there is no sign of any undeclared nuclear material and activity in these three locations,” the IAEA said, adding that environmental samples taken will be analyzed.

Quoted by Tass, the secretary of the Russian Security Council Nikolai Patrushev had accused Kiev preparing a ‘dirty bomb’ not without the participation of the West, warning of the risk that the situation will turn into a disaster if it is not stopped.

The “obvious” conclusion of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) represents “clear and irrefutable proof” that there have been no preparations for a “dirty bomb” in Ukraine, Ukrainian President Voldymyr Zelensky said. “We have given full freedom of action” to the IAEA inspection mission and after its conclusion, “we have clear and irrefutable evidence that no one in Ukraine has created or is producing dirty bombs,” he added.

The Russian Foreign Ministry meanwhile he presented a “strong protest” to the British ambassador in Moscow, accusing London of training Ukrainian forces for the purpose of sabotage in the Black and Azov seas. This was reported by the Tass agency. “We have information that the British Navy supplied the Ukrainian side with submarine drones“.

According to Moscow, British actions such as the training of Ukrainian military for the purpose of sabotage at sea, bring “the threat of an escalation of the situation and can lead to unpredictable and dangerous consequences”. “All responsibility for the harmful consequences” that may ensue “will fall entirely on the British side”.

REPRODUCTION RESERVED © Copyright ANSA


Back to top button